Hamlet 2.0

I have recently come across two amazing examples of digital humanities in which traditional content of Hamlet and the Canterbury Tales is presented via fundamentally new interfaces. The way this content is styled allows for the viewer and reader to interact with these classics in startling new ways.

The Canterbury Tales and edtech? Chaucer’s 14th Century classic ? Yep, you guessed it, there’s now an app for that. And it’s amazing; and it is a great example of embedding print within multimedia to enhance understanding.

VR is another medium that shows great promise. Thus far, it seems that the military and gaming industry is using it more than anyone. Artists, scholars and writers really haven’t figured out what to do with it yet. I look at a lot of VR so I can filter the junk and share the best with all of you. And much of it isn’t very good. So, I was thrilled to discover this 360 performance of Hamlet. Go grab a Google Cardboard headset or get a better one from the tech suites to watch it. You haven’t really seen anything like this before. Here’s what the Grey Lady had to say about it.

Both of these are stunning. Check them out! I encourage us to think more about teaching kids how to begin to do this. It will be sloppy and messy. For instance, we have no clear understanding of how to grade such work. It takes us far out of our comfort level and area of expertise.

But wouldn’t it be fun?

Highlighting New Projects feature on Google Earth and Step to Step Tutorial Makers

Ever want to make a step by step “how to” tutorial for a tech tool? I make videos and write posts such as these to show others how to use tech tools.

I recently came across Iorad.com, a step by step instruction guide for anything you want to show others how to do online. It couldn’t be easier, you simply record yourself doing whatever it is you wish to show others how to do. Then Iorad breaks the process up into its component parts and let’s the viewer toggle through the steps. For all of you who have an online textbook, this would be a really useful tool to show kids steps they need to take to access material early in the year. Or if you are having kids use a program they’ve not used before, make an iorad. This is very meta, but here’s an iorad on how to get and use iorad.  

If you can think of ways you might use iorad, leave a comment.

I really want to again highlight a terrific new feature in Google Earth. I first mentioned them in this post from December, I really like the tourbuilder feature in “Projects” Here’s Iorad in action showing how to use it.

11 STEPS


1

The first step is to open Google Earth and click three bars in top left of screen

Step 1 image


2

Click Projects

Step 2 image


3

Click New Project

Step 3 image


4

Name the project

Step 4 image


5

Add description if you’d like and then add your first feature. 

Step 5 image


6

Click New Feature

Step 6 image


7

In search bar, type in first place on the tour. 

Step 7 image


8

One can drop a pin or picture and also add a description of the place.  

Step 8 image


9

Save Slide to the project to add the slide. Click Edit Place to add more text or images to this “slide”.

Step 9 image


10

You can see on this view that the next step would be to add new feature. You can click the person icon to add a collaborator. 

Step 10 image


11

That’s it. Ideas for classroom use: researching locations of scientific discoveries, creating a tour of a country, place, or region. Other topics could include: animal habitats, geography, weather & climate, indigenous people and foreign language.

Step 11 image

Here’s an interactive tutorial for the visual learners

https://www.iorad.com/player/1629634/Earth-Google—How-to-Make-a-Tour-in-Google-Earth

11 STEPS


1

The first step is to open Google Earth and click three bars in top left of screen

Step 1 image


2

Click Projects

Step 2 image


3

Click New Project

Step 3 image


4

Name the project

Step 4 image


5

Add description if you’d like and then add your first feature. 

Step 5 image


6

Click New Feature

Step 6 image


7

In search bar, type in first place on the tour. 

Step 7 image


8

One can drop a pin or picture and also add a description of the place.  

Step 8 image


9

Save Slide to the project to add the slide. Click Edit Place to add more text or images to this “slide”.

Step 9 image


10

You can see on this view that the next step would be to add new feature. You can click the person icon to add a collaborator. 

Step 10 image


11

That’s it. Ideas for classroom use: researching locations of scientific discoveries, creating a tour of a country, place, or region. Other topics could include: animal habitats, geography, weather & climate, indigenous people and foreign language.

Step 11 image

Here’s an interactive tutorial for the visual learners

https://www.iorad.com/player/1629634/Earth-Google—How-to-Make-a-Tour-in-Google-Earth

Here is a an example of a tour followed by additional tutorials on how to use this new projects feature. I’ve already used it in history class for kids to make tours of Antietam and Gettysburg. I’ve had students in IR class use it as part of their final project.

It’s still a new tool. It works best on Chromebooks. This will not work on an iPad and I’ve seen it work for most (but not all) of my students who have MacOS- Brizhay made this one on her Mac using the Chrome Browser. It does not work on Safari. There are also sharing features that are really cool. One can co-create a tour with another; it’s fully collaborative. But here too, this feature isn’t available to those using a Mac. and I can’t say I am sure why.

I wholeheartedly recommend this tool. Reach out if you want to help in learning how to use Iorad our GoogleEarth Projects feature or to talk about ways to use these tools or any other tech integrations for the classroom.

Getting to Know Daydream VR Headsets

VR allows for an experience of immersive environments similar to or completely different from the real world. FCIT boasts a cart that provides 12 Lenovo Daydream VR headsets. Take you class to the cart or the cart to your class! Each headset has a different number from A-1 to A-12. Each pairs with a unique control pad. It’s easy to get your hands on these VR headset. 

 

  • Each headset is paired with a control pad, so pick up a headset and find the control pad with the same number. 
  • Push the POWER button on the side of the headset for a few seconds until the light starts flashing, and then put on the headset.  
  • If you want to change your position, face the direction you want and press the circle button for a few seconds. Then the direction will be reset. 

Still wondering what to do? Here are 3 recommendations:

Expeditions Expeditions provide many VR videos in different categories. It is a good app to experience, learn things and relax.  This video gives a good tutorial on how to use guided tours in Expeditions. 
YouTube VR Use your cursor to click the YouTube VR icon. Browse the 360 column or search what you want to watch and enjoy!
Google Arts and Culture  You can appreciate famous art pieces and learn the history behind them the app, Arts and Culture. Browse the collections and click on the painting that you want to view, and listen to the introduction of the art piece. If you forget how to use the cursor to explore, just look down at your cursor, and you can see all the instructions. 

 

 

How to Upload Videos from iPhone/ iPad to Google Drive.

   Recently, some have reported having difficulty with sending  video files recorded on iPhones to Google Drive. The way to do it is to pull it into drive instead of pushing it out to drive.
  1. On your iPhone or iPad, open the Google Drive app.
  2. Tap Add .
  3. Tap Upload.
  4. Find and tap the files you want to upload. To upload photos or videos, tap the photos and videos you want and tap Upload.
This seems to work without any problems at all.

Two Storytelling Tools

There’s something about a well-done multi-media presentation that is greater than the sum of its parts.

This amazing map of the floods of 2019 along the Mississippi is a terrific example. I make no claim to produce anything so amazing, but one of my favorite digital tools- a real go-to tool for me- is Adobe Spark Page. I made sparkpage embedded below for my history students. It originally was just a google doc. But in about 40 minutes I was able to make this. To me, it is more engaging than a Google doc and I expect it is for students also.  War of 1812

Powtoon is another terrific tool. That’s why I am so happy to highlight an example from Sonia Chin and Holly McCloskey who used ed-tech tools to have students demonstrate mastery outside of the traditional test format. They asked students to produce videos as part of their Bio II Adv. Final. Sonia and Holly purposefully wanted students to use a storytelling medium to share out and reflect upon what they learned. 

These new, easy to use storytelling tools allow us to assign creative projects equal to any test’s demands for knowing at any level of Bloom’s taxonomy of while also promoting communication, collaboration and creativity. 

I’d be happy to come to any class and share these tools and others. Book me with a help ticket.

After break, I will highlight Synth (my students’ have a pending assignment with it), a free podcasting tool specializing in 256 second long podcasts. Click here for a sneak preview/ explanation.